Syncretic Tendencies

Quotidian Inspiration From Your Nonlocal Noosphere

But he is enslaved by the one great fallacy of the mystics, that mysticism, religion and poetry have to do with the abstract. Thinkers of Mr. Waite’s school have a tendency to believe that the concrete is the symbol of the abstract. The truth, the truth at the root of all true mysticism, is quite the other way. The abstract is the symbol of the concrete. This may possibly seem at first sight a paradox; but it is a purely transcendental truth. We see a green tree; it is the green tree which we cannot understand; it is the green tree which we fear; it is the green tree which we worship. Then because there are so many green trees, so many men, so many elephants, so many butterflies, so many daisies, so many animalculae, we coin a general term ‘Life.’ And then the mystic comes and says that a green tree symbolises Life. It is not so. Life symbolises a green tree. Just in so far as we get into the abstract, we get away from the reality, we get away from the mystery, we get away from the tree. And this is the reason that so many transcendental discourses are merely blank and tedious to us, because they have to do with Truth and Beauty, and the Destiny of the Soul, and all the great, faint, faded symbols of the reality. And this is why all poetry is so interesting to us, because it has to do with skies, with woods, with battles, with temples, with women and with wine, with the ultimate miracles which no philosopher could create. The difference between the concrete and the abstract is the difference between the country and the town. God made the concrete, but man made the abstract. A truthful man is a miracle, but the truth is a commonplace.

—G.K. Chesterton: “The Speaker,” May 31, 1902 (via hierarchical-aestheticism)

(via tectusregis)

In Nature, there are neither rewards nor punishments - there are consequences.

—Robert G. Ingersoll (via i3elle)

(Source: vandrare, via blaqmercury)

I don’t believe in bad experiences.

Christ’s crucifixion, his going to the Father, the spirit, is not something that should not have happened.

It must happen.

The hero’s death and resurrection is a model for the casting off of the old life and moving into the new.

—Joseph Campbell, A Joseph Campbell Companion: Reflections on the Art of Living

Speak your deepest truth, even if it means losing everything—your pride, your status, your image, even your way of life.
A life of lies and half-truths, the burden of unspoken things, will eventually suffocate you and everyone around you.
Give up everything for a truthful existence. Know that you can only lose what’s non-essential.

—Jeff Foster (via enduring-observer)

(Source: ineffable-play, via child-of-the-universe)

Sometimes you meet someone, and it’s so clear that the two of you, on some level belong together. As lovers, or as friends, or as family, or as something entirely different. You just work, whether you understand one another or you’re in love or you’re partners in crime. You meet these people throughout your life, out of nowhere, under the strangest circumstances, and they help you feel alive. I don’t know if that makes me believe in coincidence, or fate, or sheer blind luck, but it definitely makes me believe in something.

unknown (via surya-bhakti)

(Source: quozio.com, via steepyoursoul)